The Platial Analysis Lab is a research group based out of McGill University at the intersection of geoinformatics and quantitative behavioral geography…

As the name suggests, the Lab pulls apart the concept of place, taking a data-driven and behavioral approach to understanding the dimensions of our world.

Presentation to the MTL Machine Learning Group

Last week Grant McKenzie presented a talk entitled “A machine learning approach to identifying urban neighborhood names” at the Montreal Machine Learning Group meetup in downtown Montreal. Check out the video below.

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Platial at the Annual AAG Meeting in D.C.

Another American Association of Geographers (AAG) meeting has come to a close, this time in Washington, D.C. By all accounts the meeting was a success and it is always great to catch up with spatial scientists in their natural habitat.

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Montreal Building Footprints

Microsoft just recently published their Building Footprints dataset for Canada. A quick analysis of the coverage for the Island of Montreal shows that there are considerable differences…

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GIS Day @ McGill

GIS Day is on Wednesday, November 14th this year and McGill will be hosting a number of GIS day events in the Geographic Information Center (Burnside 5th floor).

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Projects

Micro-mobility Services

We are in the midst of a technology-induced paradigm shift in transportation.

Predicting Financial Access

Access to digital financial services is fundamental to enabling those living in poverty around the world to become more economically stable, prosperous, and resilient.

Urban Pulse

Visualization the Pulse of the City

Scientometrics

Data Enrichment, Knowledge Discovery and Interactive Visualization Tools

Neighborhood Delineation

Identification and delineation of neighborhoods based on user-contributed geospatial content

FrankenPlace

An interactive thematic map search engine

Lab Members

Grant McKenzie

Assistant Professor

Grant McKenzie is an assistant professor in the Department of Geography at McGill University in Montréal, Canada. He holds a PhD in Geography from the University of California, Santa Barbara (2015), a Master of Applied Science degree from the University of Melbourne (2008) and a Bachelors in Geography from the University of British Columbia (2002). Dr. McKenzie’s research interests lie in spatio-temporal data analysis, geovisualization, place-based analytics and the intersection of information technologies and society. Currently, he is exploring computational, data-driven models of human behavior, taking a multi-dimensional approach to investigating the relationship between place & space and the activities people carry out at those places. The foundation of this research involves working with large geosocial, user-contributed and authoritative datasets, exploiting and visualizing spatial, temporal and thematic signatures within the data. These signatures are employ through unique methods and statistical models for the development of effective interactive (desktop and mobile) geovisualization, place-based prediction models and knowledge discovery applications.

Mikael Brunila

Doctoral Student

Mikael Brunila is a PhD student in Geography at McGill University. He graduated in 2017 as a Fulbright scholar from the Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences program at Columbia University. He completed his Bachelor’s degree in Political Science with minor subjects in Economics and Computer Science at the University of Helsinki in 2016. Brunila uses GIS, Bayesian inference and natural language processing to study semantic geographies in the sharing economy, governance through data science and machine learning as well as urban social movements. He previously worked as a journalist and has co-authored books on the far-right in Finland, on the implementation of zero tolerance politics against graffiti in Helsinki and on the political economy of the Internet. Brunila is also a member of the Urban Politics and Governance Lab lead by professor David Wachsmuth.

Morgan Guttman

Undergraduate Intern

Morgan is a 4th year student at McGill, completing a major in archaeology/anthropology and a minor in GIS and remote sensing. He is interested in the ways that these fields can compliment each other, especially the application of geographical perspectives in understanding the spatial variability of human cultural activities on the landscape, both in the past and the present. He continuously aims to learn more about GIS and quantitative methods for spatial analysis and has currently been accepted for the arts undergraduate research internship awards. He is working on a project over the summer analyzing place-based activity patterns in Montreal and Toronto, and he hopes to gain valuable experience in geospatial and statistical analysis from this internship.